The National Pain Strategy: A Vision

(Excerpt from the 2015 draft National Pain Strategy)

National Pain Strategy

If the objectives of the National Pain Strategy are achieved, the nation would see a decrease in prevalence across the continuum of pain, from acute, to chronic, to high-impact chronic pain, and across the life span from pediatric through geriatric populations, to end of life, which would reduce the burden of pain for individuals, families, and society as a whole. Americans experiencing pain—across this broad continuum —would have timely access to a care system that meets their biopsychosocial needs and takes into account individual preferences, risks, and social contexts. In other words, they would receive patient-centered care.

Further, Americans in general would recognize chronic pain as a complex disease and a threat to public health and to a just and productive society. Because of this greater understanding, significant public resources would be invested in the areas of preventing pain, creating access to evidence-based and high-quality pain assessment and treatment services and improving self-management abilities among those with pain. In addition, individuals who live with chronic pain would be viewed and treated with compassion and respect. Specifically, substantial progress in the care system would be achieved as follows:

Americans in general would recognize chronic pain as a complex disease and a threat to public health and to a just and productive society. Significant public resources would be invested in the areas of preventing pain, creating access to evidence-based and high-quality pain assessment and treatment services and improving self-management abilities among those with pain. Individuals who live with chronic pain would be viewed and treated with compassion and respect. Specifically, substantial progress in the care system would be achieved as follows:

  • Clinicians would take active prevention measures to prevent the progression of acute to chronic pain and its associated disabilities.
  • Clinicians would undertake comprehensive assessments of patients with chronic pain, leading to an integrated plan of coordinated care, managed by an interdisciplinary team, when needed. Treatment would involve high-quality, state-of-the-art, multimodal, evidence-based practices.
  • People with all levels of pain would have access to educational materials and effective approaches for self-care and pain self-management programs that would help them prevent, cope with, and reduce pain and its disability, and they would have better information about the benefits and risks of pain management options.

All Americans would be assured of obtaining preventive, assessment, treatment, and self-care interventions and support without bias, discrimination, or stigma.

2017-11-28T10:52:37-08:00Tuesday, January 12, 2016|National Pain Strategy|